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We started with Menachem, Adam and myself playing One Night Ultimate Werewolf, a deception game where you don’t even know what team you are on until the end. There’s nothing quite as devious as being a werewolf and avoiding being killed…only to find out you’re no longer a werewolf and as a villager you just lost the game. The first game went pretty quickly….Adam was a werewolf and forgot to plan his lie out, making it so that even though he picked up the pace later, when Menachem was faced with choosing who to side with, he joined me and we correctly assassinated Adam. Round two I was the werewolf, and I started with an early game lie that hid my cover well, but as Adam managed to slowly give away that he was the Seer and I was the werewolf, we both managed to figure out that Menachem’s lack of being helpful resulted due to him being the new werewolf, and we succesfully pointed our fingers at him to kill him. Round three went pretty quickly with a bit of a game flaw, and despite me seeing through Adam’s poker face, Menachem decided to vote round robin and leave him alive. For shame Menachem, for shame.

183f30a5cc283408b61d06ffb0768693_largeOn a side point I just looked up how well it plays with 3, and 3.3% say best, 32.8% say recommended, and 63.9% says not recommended…so there you go. Looks like it improves with 4 but still not great, then 5 shifts to being really good but not great, and finally 6-8 seems to be the sweet spot with 9-10 receding down a bit again.

From there we moved to Terra Mystica, the number two rated game on boardgamegeek, and an epic economic game with tight decisions that will make or break the whole game. It’s here that we once again find that write-ups on economic games are less interesting and harder to write. Menachem spent a chunk of the game building up for the end game, which while useful, wasn’t enough to give him the end game. In the meantime, Adam and Menachem spent time fighting on the Cult track while Sender drifted behind. That being said, Sender managed to score the most points in the round to round bonus giving him a bit off an early lead during the game. As power shifted from bowl to bowl, and territories were transformed and built, the 6 rounds of the game flew past with points slowly climbing on each of us. While Adam and Menachem went for early game temples, Sender went for the early game Stronghold, each giving great bonuses in different directions. But as the game slowly drifted into the last turn, the points were tallied, and while at first it looked like Sender had the game, the last few points drifted in Adam’s favor and he won by a small margin to take the game. A solid game that lasts 30-40 minutes per player, maybe 40-50 for your first game. Definitely needs 2-3 plays to really be able to dive in and see what’s really on the table.

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